Go to Home Page
  :: :: Issues Health & Enviornment Radiation Exposure and Compensation

Radiation Exposure and Compensation - Highlights

The Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (RECA) was enacted in 1990 (P.L. 101-426). This law required the Federal Government to compensate individuals who developed disease due to unintended exposure to radiation from atomic testing fallout. This law also established a list of conditions to be met for compensation and a list of compensable cancers. Eleven bills were introduced in the 106th Congress that would amend this act by expanding the eligibility requirements for compensation. One measure, S 1515, was signed into law on July 10, 2000 (P.L. 106-245).

Printer Friendly


RADIATION EXPOSURE AND COMPENSATION

S 1515

Radiation Exposure Compensation Act Amendments

Sen Orrin Hatch (R-UT)

Introduced on Aug. 5, 1999 to extend financial compensation to miners and workers harmed by working with radioactive materials.. S 1515 expands previous compensation acts to include compensation for brain, lung, bladder, colon, ovary, and salivary cancers. S 1515 establishes a grant program to states for education, prevention, and early detection of radiogenic cancers. NCI-designated cancer centers are among the entities eligible for grants.

S 1515 was signed into law (PL 106-245) by President Clinton on July 10, 2000.

HR 930

Radiation Exposure Compensation Act

Rep Patsy Mink (D-HI)

Introduced on March 2, 1999 to cover claims for injuries due to exposure to radiation from nuclear testing. HR 930 would remove the requirement that exposure resulting in stomach cancer occur before age 30.

Many bills were introduced in the 106th Congress to amend the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (RECA) by expanding the eligibility requirements for compensation. One of these bills, S 1515, was signed (PL 106-245). Further action is not expected during this Congress on HR 930 or other measures that amend RECA. When the 106th Congress adjourns, the measures will die.

HR 1045/S 367

Radiation Exposure Compensation Improvement Act of 1999

Rep Tom Udall (D-NM)

Sen Jeff Bingaman (R-NM)

Introduced in the House on March 9, 1999 and in the Senate on Feb. 4 1999 to provide for partial restitution to individuals who worked in uranium mines, mills, or transport which provided uranium for the use and benefit of the US Government.

See status of HR 930

HR 1516

Radiation Workers Justice Act of 1999

Rep Joe Skeen (R-NM)

Introduced on April 21, 1999 to provide for compensation payment to individuals exposed to radiation as the result of working in uranium mines and mills which provided uranium for the use and benefit of the US Government.

See status of HR 930

HR 1286

Justice for Atomic Veterans Act

Rep Lane Evans (D-IL)

Introduced on March 25, 1999 to expand the list of diseases presumed to be service connected with respect to radiation-exposed veterans.

See status of HR 930

HR 4263

Atomic Workers Compensation Act

Rep Tom Udall (D-NM)

Introduced on April 12, 2000 to establish a compensation and health care program for employees and survivors at the Dept. of Energy facility in Los Alamos, NM.

See status of HR 930

HR 4588

Alaska Amchitka Island Workers' Relief Amendments of 2000

Rep Don Young (R-AK)

Introduced on June 6, 2000 to include workers who were employed on Amchitka Island, Alaska in the construction and maintenance of deep shafts for underground nuclear testing.

See status of HR 930

HR 4921

For Veterans Exposed to Ionizing Radiation During Military Service

Rep Patsy Mink (D-HI)

Introduced on July 24, 2000 to revise the eligibility criteria for presumption of service-connection of certain diseases and disabilities for veterans exposed to ionizing radiation during military service.

Many bills were introduced in the 106th Congress to amend the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (RECA) by expanding the eligibility requirements for compensation. One of these bills, S 1515, was signed (PL 106-245). HR 4921 was introduced after S 1515 passed to address remaining gaps in RECA. HR 4921 was referred to the House Veterans Affairs Committee and was not acted upon. When the 106th Congress adjourns, the measure will die.

HR 5189

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Act

Rep Mark Udall (D-CO)

Introduced on Sept 14, 2000 to provide for compensation payment for certain individuals employed in connection with Federal nuclear weapons programs who sustained occupational illness in the line of duty.

Many bills were introduced in the 106th Congress to amend the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (RECA) by expanding the eligibility requirements for compensation. One of these bills, S 1515, was signed (PL 106-245). HR 5189 was introduced after S 1515 passed to address remaining gaps in RECA, and was referred jointly to the following House committees: Ways and Means; Education and the Workforce; Judiciary. Since no committee acted, the measure will die when the 106th Congress adjourns.

S 1810

Veterans Claims and appeals Procedures Clarification and Improvement Act

Sen Patty Murray (D-WA)

Introduced on Oct. 27, 1999 to clarify and improve veterans’ claims and appellate procedures. Included is a requirement that the VA provide benefits to veterans who were exposed to radiation during their service and who since have lung, brain, ovarian or colon cancer.

S 1810 passed the Senate on Sept. 21, 2000 and was received in the House on Sept. 22.