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Test Ban

  • Public Support for a Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Remains Strong,” September 1997, Coalition to Reduce Nuclear Dangers
    One year after President Clinton signed the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) in New York, a new nationwide poll shows that 70.3% of Americans “think the US Senate should approve a Treaty with 140 other countries that would prohibit underground nuclear weapons explosions worldwide.”

  • After Indian Nuke Tests, Support for the Test Ban Treaty Remains Strong,” May 1998, Coalition to Reduce Nuclear Dangers

  • Presentation of Findings from Statewide Surveys in Kansas, Nebraska, Oregon, Tennessee and Utah External Link ,” July 1998, Coalition to Reduce Nuclear Dangers

  • Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Draws Strong Public Support, According to Review of Polls,” October 1998, University of Maryland's Program on International Policy Attitudes
    A review of all publicly available polling data by the University of Maryland's Program on International Policy Attitudes has found very strong public support for ratification of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty being considered by the US Senate.

  • Public Support for a Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Remains High", July 1999, Coalition to Reduce Nuclear Dangers
    Over twenty-one months after President Clinton transmitted the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) to the United States Senate for approval, nationwide polls show that 82% of Americans still “think the United States Senate should approve...of this treaty,” according to the latest survey (The Mellman Group/Withlin Worldwide, June 1999). The latest poll is consistent with test ban survey results over the past four decades.

  • Senate Test Ban Vote Little Noticed, Less Understood External Link ,” October 1999, Pew Research Center
    The US Senate's rejection of the underground nuclear test ban treaty has gone unnoticed by half of the public, and only one-in-ten Americans say they have heard a lot about why some in the Senate backed the treaty, while others opposed it. Just about half of respondents (49%) polled in a Pew Research Center survey conducted 15-19 October 1999, were at all aware of the vote, and only 21% say they have heard a lot about it.